Part 3, research point 1 – self portraits

The brief is to research self portraits by various artists over a broad time span and to focus on five or six that appeal. The notes are to include comments on whether or not the artist portrays themselves in the process of painting/as an artist along with thoughts about what the purpose of the portrait might be and the impression the artist may be trying to convey. This is very similar to a research point in the drawing module where I looked at Rembrandt, van Gogh, Frieda Kahlo, and Paula Rego. I decided to revisit that post to see if … Continue reading Part 3, research point 1 – self portraits

Part 4, project 6 – research point #2

Historic and contemporary self portraits. I chose Rembrandt and van Gogh as my historic examples (then read that they were recommended) because of their very different approaches. I particularly liked Rembrandt’s honesty with regard to his image when he was older; the unvarnished truth of it and the lack of glamour. His style is very much about realism, these were the instagrams of the day, the selfies, and many of his clients paying for commissions were likely to require a very positive image of themselves and their surroundings. Van Gogh, an insular man with some enormous troubles, painted fractured images … Continue reading Part 4, project 6 – research point #2

Figure, form, and light: Rego, Vermeer, Lautrec, Schiele, da Vinci

Not yet a research point but as I came across it via the drawing module, I’m including some of the material here. Toulouse Lautrec – before the simplified nature of his posters (necessitated, I understand, by the printing process), his drawings were quite loose and almost cartoonish. There was a great deal of movement and energy, often with large numbers of characters and a focal individual. ‘La Danse au Moulin Rouge’ looks to me like a picture of spontaneous uninhibited fun. Egon Schiele – I envy the economy of line, and suggestion of form, but I am less keen on … Continue reading Figure, form, and light: Rego, Vermeer, Lautrec, Schiele, da Vinci

Paula Rego – BBC documentary and Gompertz review of exhibition

Dame Paula Rego: Will Gompertz reviews Obediance and Defiance show in Milton Keynes. BBC News, Entertainment and Arts, June 2019 https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-48616934?xtor=ES-211-%5B23633_PANUK_DIV_25_ART_PaulaRego_Over35_Mopup%5D-20190623-%5Bbbcnews_damepaularegowillgompertzreviewsobedienceandefianceshowinmiltonkeynes_news%5D I’ve just watched the BBC’s 2017 documentary, Secrets and Stories, on Rego (which is due to expire in twelve days from now but just in case of a reprieve, this is the link https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b08kz9qz/paula-rego-secrets-and-stories?xtor=ES-211-%5B23633_PANUK_DIV_25_ART_PaulaRego_Over35_Mopup%5D-20190623-%5Bbbctwo_paularegosecretsandstories_factualarts%5D) and found my first speculations about the deeper issues referred to in short biographies to be both justified and deepened. Being born in Portugal into a world in which fascism and repression – particularly of women – meant much of what was real in terms … Continue reading Paula Rego – BBC documentary and Gompertz review of exhibition

Paula Rego

I was pointed at Rego’s work by my Drawing tutor who seemed to know intuitively the kind of image I’d find interesting. I’d never heard of her but her Dancing Ostriches will stay with me for a long time. [As if it weren’t obvious, the drawing on the left is my attempt at a copy]   From a 2016 BBC article accessed 07/04/19 These dancers are as far from Degas’ delicates as it’s possible to get, and although I have always liked his representations of ballet, they seem wispy and idealised next to Rego’s chunky, muscular, powerhouses of women. Not … Continue reading Paula Rego